REVIEW: Declutter Your Mind Now – 22 Simple Habits To Declutter Your Mind & Live A Happier, Healthier And Stress-Free Life: Easy Ways To Eliminate Worry, Anxiety & Negative Thinking

Declutter Your Mind Now – 22 Simple Habits To Declutter Your Mind  & Live A Happier, Healthier and Stress-Free Life: Easy Ways To Eliminate Worry, Anxiety & Negative Thinking by Vic Carter

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BOOK SUMMARY:

Declutter Your Mind Easily 
Would You Like To ELIMINATE NEGATIVE & STRESSFUL THOUGHTS From Your Mind? 
Do You Want To OVERCOME WORRY & ANXIETY? 
Are You Interested In Feeling MORE RELAXED, HAPPY & HEALTHY? 


In this book, I tell you about how you can get more peace, happiness and clarity into your life just like I did. I have gone through the process of decluttering my mind and practice the habits and techniques outlined in this book. 


I used to often feel overwhelmed, anxious and stressful prior to using the techniques in this book. I remember the days when I used to feel anxious about my work, stressed about different things in my life, and overwhelmed in general. I learned about and started practising the strategies listed in this book to ensure that I feel better and take care of my overall health. 


So, I have filled this book with step-by-step information, practical tips and useful suggestions to help you to declutter your mind, and live a MORE RELAXED, HAPPY & HEALTHY LIFE. 

This book, ‘22 Simple Habits To Declutter Your Mind & Live A Happier, Healthier And Stress-Free Life’ will show you how to: 
· Declutter your mind of negative thoughts and emotions 
· How to be free of worry, anxiety and stress 
· Be happier, more relaxed and stress-free 



BOOK REVIEW:


3 STARS

When I first received a copy of this book, I was thinking to myself “Wow, it is such a short read!”, to which Carter addressed in this book that he does not wish to clutter this book with unnecessary information. It is true, in less than 70 pages, you’re able to learn how to declutter your mind and this time, you will definitely be able to finish this self-help book.

22 Simple habits, all tried, tested and true to be able to help you declutter your mind. Some of them I’ve heard of before, some I’ve tried myself and it works. Some of the suggested ways may be a little bit difficult to start, like exercise or perhaps taking up a new hobby, but there are more ways that can be applied in day to day life. 

I do believe in the content as it has worked for me. In Declutter Your Mind Now, there are simple steps like being in the now, listing 3 positives for 1 negatives and choosing happy thoughts can be easily incorporated into our lives. It may seem difficult at first, but it should be cultivated and then it can come naturally.

Carter has also attached some more reading materials in every chapter for further reading if you wish to understand more. As for his book, only the basics of the ways to declutter your minds and benefits are provided.

REVIEW: Tributaries

Tributaries (American River, #1)
by Mallory M. O’Connor

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BOOK SUMMARY:

In the mid-1800s, three immigrant familiesIrish, Japanese, and Mexicansettle along the American River in Northern California. A century later, only one family remains.
Owen McPhalans Mockingbird Valley Ranch is still a thriving family business in 1959. But when his wife, Marian, leaves Mockingbird to follow her dream of becoming a successful artist, she ignites a firestorm that impacts the descendants of all three families. As artists, musicians, writers, and politicians inherit their immigrant parents’ hopes, they are torn apart by ambition, prejudice, and deception while struggling through the turbulent 1960s. From the concert halls of Europe to Kyoto’s ancient avenues, and Manhattan’s artists’ lofts to San Francisco’s North Beach, they each learn the price they must pay in order to realize their dreams. But just as the river is drawn to the sea, they eventually find themselves pulled back to the place that forged the original link between their destinies is a place called Mockingbird.


American River: Tributaries follows three California families as the descendants of Irish, Japanese, and Mexican immigrants embark on unique journeys to pursue their dreams amid an unsettled 1960s world.

BOOK REVIEW: 
3 STARS

*A free PDF copy of this book was given in exchange for an honest review*

I wanted the story to be a surprise for me but I should’ve read the reviews first. Little did I know that it would contain a few explicit materials and would not have picked it up.

Right off the bat, I was confused about what was happening. There was a list of characters and their roles at the start which I loved but it was difficult to keep on scrolling back and forth to find out who was who. This made reading the first few chapters a little bit tough.

I love the way the relationship between the three families and how their paths intertwined, especially between the McPhalan and the Ashida’s. It was very creative, albeit a little disappointing that their role was being servants for the McPhalans. I especially love the storyline of the Morales’ family. There’s so much drama!

It was difficult for me to continue reading this story. One of the main reason was that I didn’t find the storyline to be interesting for me. This, of course, varies from one individual to another so do pick it up if you love drama. I, unfortunately, am not a big fan of it. Another reason was the fact that there were quite a handful of sexually explicit parts which I would tend to scroll past. I’ve decided to drop the book since I can’t do it justice.

American Rivers: Tributaries had tons of unexpected twists. There were some parts which I found to be a little problematic that could be overlooked in the story, after all, it is there to add to the drama. Overall, it was a well-written book that explored the lives of three families from different backgrounds and how their lives intertwine.

REVIEW: The Colossus Rises

Seven Wonders: The Colossus Rises (#1)
by Peter Lerangis

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BOOK SUMMARY:

One Boy

Jack McKinley is an ordinary kid with an extraordinary problem. In a few months, he’s going to die.

One Mission

Jack needs to find seven magic loculi that, when combined, have the power to cure him.

One Problem

The loculi are the relics of a lost civilization and haven’t been seen in thousands of years.

Seven Wonders

Because they’re hidden in the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. 

BOOK REVIEW:
3 STARS

I read this book a while ago, back in 2013. I didn’t like it at that time, too confusing, too unclear. Everything happened so quickly and I didn’t get time to process it. 5 years later, I decided to give it another chance.

For those who likes the PJO series, the plot will seem familiar – young boy and his friends with a task to save the world, cliché of course, but nonetheless, a favourite. However, I won’t be comparing to PJO much because it is an entirely different series.

Four 12 year-olds, captured by the Karai Institute and given the task to find seven magic Loculi that were scattered around the world. With a special G7W gene that will kill them at the age of 13, these 4 Select have to receive treatment from the Karai in order to prolong their deaths. Only by retrieving the Loculi, they can be saved.

The story was written very descriptively. It was easy for the readers to imagine every event of the story, from how the characters felt to the surroundings of the places. However, it can be quite distracting from the story.
It was an entertaining read. The characters were introduced early on and there wasn’t much to them, if I were to be honest. There was no time for the relationship to develop between the characters. Within a few moments of Jack and the other 3 Select meeting one another, they have gotten super close and chummy. I guess the writer should’ve developed their relationships a little. I mean, when you’re facing a life and death situation, you should kinda get to know your allies and gain their trust a little.

The start of the book was interesting. There were a few plot holes about the story though, but of course, it wouldn’t affect the story much anyway. Towards the end, the story got a little messy. So many things were happening, so many descriptions, yet everything seemed so blurry.
I wasn’t particularly fond of the book, nor the characters. Like I mentioned, the characters were flat. It was all in Jack McKinley’s point of view but then again, it really seemed bland. Nothing much was revealed about them, but of course, maybe the author left it for the next book, Lost in Babylon.

REVIEW: The Peculiar Life of a Lonely Postman by Denis Thériault

The Peculiar Life of a Lonely Postman
by Denis Thériault

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BOOK SUMMARY:

Bilodo lives a solitary daily life, routinely completing his postal rounds every day and returning to his empty Montreal apartment. But he has found a way to break the cycle—Bilodo has taken to stealing people’s mail, steaming open the envelopes, and reading the letters inside. And so it is he comes across Ségolène’s letters. She is corresponding with Gaston, a master poet, and their letters are each composed of only three lines. They are writing each other haikus. The simplicity and elegance of their poems move Bilado and he begins to fall in love with her. But one day, out on his round, he witnesses a terrible and tragic accident. Just as Gaston is walking up to the post-box to mail his next haiku to Ségolène, he is hit by a car and dies on the side of the road. And so Bilodo makes an extraordinary decision—he will impersonate Gaston and continue to write to Ségolène under this guise. But how long can the deception continue for? Denis Thériault weaves a passionate and elegant tale, comic and tragic with a love story at its heart

BOOK REVIEW: 

3 STARS
What stood out for this book was the interesting plot. The idea that our trusted postman could be someone who finds thrill and excitement in reading our mail was the last thing I’d think of, and Thériault turned the whole idea into a book. What enticed me about the book was the haikus and the thought of communicating through haikus fascinated me, something I did not think was possible.

Bilodo was just like us – seeing a romantic love story and falling in love with one of the characters, infatuated with a love life that he wish he had. And when he saw his chance to be the next actor of this love story, he jumped at it.

The plot was interesting and somewhat different. It introduces different Japanese literary art like ‘tanka’, ‘renku’ and ‘enso’ but it happened all in a blur and I could not understand any of it. The only reason why I bothered continuing the book was to look for good haikus. Unfortunately, there were only few that stood out.

It was rather creepy of Bilodo to have such a hobby and it certainly made me wonder if any of the postmen did the same. He invaded the privacy of others, just for his mere enjoyment. Poor Ségolène, if only she knew. Their poor love story would never had happened.

The ending was unexpected, but nonetheless, I loved it. It felt as if the entire story had come to a full circle. It also leaves me wondering, had ‘Grandpré’ really been Grandpré?

TL:DR

I believe I expected too much from this book regarding the haikus. It was a good book in terms of the plot and how unique it was. However, some parts in the book was confusing, especially when the literary arts in Japan were mentioned.


A segment of this review has been first published on my Goodreads.